28 January 2020

Litany of humility

I saw this on line, and it struck a chord with me.  It asks to be delivered of many of my many, many faults. I may perhaps add this to my daily prayers.

O Jesus! meek and humble of heart, Hear me.
From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being consulted, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being calumniated, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being forgotten, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being ridiculed, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being wronged, Deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being suspected, Deliver me, Jesus.
That others may be loved more than I, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be esteemed more than I, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That, in the opinion of the world, others may increase and I may decrease, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be chosen and I set aside, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be praised and I unnoticed, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be preferred to me in everything, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may become holier than I, provided that I may become as holy as I should, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

14 January 2020

In the world of Catholic social media...

... I see that many of my fellow Catholics are very much  up in arms about a book that has not yet been published and which no one has yet read.   That is not preventing anyone from arguing about the book's merits and heaping praise or slander upon the authors.

Is it any wonder we are no longer taken seriously?

11 January 2020

Yesterday in history

On this day in 49BC, Caesar crossed the Rubicon. If you like your history in the Great Man/Great Moment format, this is a biggie.

(Actually, it is hard to tell if this was the actual day.  The roman calendar was considerably off by this time, which lead Julius Caesar to sponsor the creation of a new and more accurate calendar shortly after this, which calendar we now call the Julian calendar.)

Lucan, in his Pharsalia, sets the scene:



Consul and Tribune broke the laws alike:
Bought were the fasces, and the people sold
For gain their favour: bribery's fatal curse
Stained every yearly contest of the Field.
Then covetous usury rose, and interest
Was greedier with the seasons; and all trust
Was crushed; and many found a boon in war.
Caesar has crossed the Alps, his mighty soul
Great tumults pondering and the coming shock.
Now on the marge of Rubicon, he saw,
In face most sorrowful and ghostly guise,
His trembling country's image; huge it seemed
Through mists of night obscure; and hoary hair
Streamed from the lofty front with turrets crowned:
Torn were her locks and naked were her arms.
Then thus, with broken sighs the Vision spake:
What seek ye, men of Rome? and whither hence
Bear ye my standards? If by right ye come,
My citizens, stay here; these are the bounds;
No further dare.' But Caesar's hair was stiff
With horror as he gazed, and ghastly dread
Restrained his footsteps on the further bank.
Then spake he, ' Thunderer, who from the rock
Tarpeian seest the wall of mighty Rome;
Gods of my race who watched o'er Troy of old;
Thou Jove of Alba's height, and Vestal fires,
And rites of Romulus erst rapt to heaven,
And God-like Rome; be friendly to my quest.
Not with impious or hostile arms I come,
Thy Caesar, conqueror by land and sea,
Thy soldier here and wheresoe'er thou wilt:
No other's; his, his only be the guilt
Whose acts make me thy foe.' He gives the word
And bids his standards cross the swollen stream.
***.
The cavalry first form across the stream
To break the torrent's force; the rest with ease
Beneath their shelter gain the further bank.
When Caesar crossed and trod beneath his feet
The soil of Italy's forbidden fields,
'Here,' spake he, 'peace, here broken laws be left;
Farewell to treaties. Fortune, lead me on;
War shall be our judge.'

10 January 2020

In your charity,

please pray for another friend and fellow blogger whose wife is in the final stages of breast cancer.

31 December 2019

In your charity...

...please pray for a friend and fellow blogger who is very ill this night, and has asked for prayers.

30 December 2019

Sharing a link

A friend sent me a link to his YouTube channel, called 'Strings and Pipes'.  In it he plays renaissance and Medieval music, mainly on a clavichord.  His children occasionally play a piece on a piano.  They are really quite good, and it is music that is seldom heard or recorded.  He has unearthed some real treasures here.  Go, look into it and enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUytNMSpMniI_v6Su1zQPUQ/videos?view_as=subscriber

26 December 2019

I think I need to add 'There's Crap on the Door" to my hymn repertoire.

Someone sent me a link to an article entitled "Hymns to Avoid".  Some of these are absolute howlers.

There are people who tend to idealize the past, to look to the works of those who came before us and say 'gosh, they really knew how to build/write/compose. etc' and they tend to forget that there has been a natural selection going on: only the best they did, the works that were deemed worthy of preservation has survived down to us.  Anything less either fell apart or was tossed long ago.  This article is a good reminder that there have always been bad hymns.  The hymns of our time are, yes, terrible, but, by the same token, no one today would compose:

O Lord, be thou the rider and we the little ass,
That to God’s Holy City together we may pass.

Ahem.

At any rate, enjoy.